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THE VANTAGE SENSOR



Vantage mHealthcare is developing a sensor that will screen for the Volatile Organic Compound signatures in a person’s breath. Our device and application (working with any smart phone, laptop or tablet) will be able to identify the presence of lung cancer from a single exhalation. Results will be able to be viewed by patient and doctor in-the-moment and when treatment options are discussed. The Vantage Sensor was developed to address one of the longest standing unmet medical needs today which involves early stage lung cancer detection and to do so in an affordable, non-invasive, safe and convenient way.

Similarly, the device will be used by law enforcement to detect the presence of marijuana on a driver’s breath. As more and more states legislate the use of marijuana for medical use the risk of driving while drugged increases as does the death toll. Currently, this represents a significant unmet need as law enforcement struggles with multiple interventions to attempt to assess the condition of drivers that, if not legally intoxicated, appear to be drugged. The Vantage Sensor and its application will provide in-the-moment results with a goal of making our roads safer for all drivers and creating a more effective tool for law enforcement.


Lung Cancer


ABC

In the March 13, 2015 ABC 7 TV Newscast  (San Francisco, Oakland San Jose) published a story with news anchor Cheryl Jennings about Paul Kalanihi a Stanford neurosurgeon who died at the age of 37 from lung cancer.
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MD Anderson

Published on August 2, 2013 by MD Anderson Cancer Center with Dr. Bevers discussing the U.S. Preventative Task Force recommendations on low dose CT scanning. Learn more about lung cancer at MD Anderson.
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Marijuana


ABC

“In the September 11, 2014 ABC News World News Tonight newscast, Clayton Sandell reported from Denver that, ‘There is no breathalyzer test and results from drawing blood can take weeks. Plus experts say seasoned users are less impaired with more in their blood and newer users are going to be impaired with less in their blood.’”
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CBS

CBS News Correspondent Barry Peterson reported on 'CBS This Morning' on March 16, 2014 that “An officer makes a roadside assessment if he suspects marijuana, but unlike alcohol, it can't be detected with a breathalyzer test. Marijuana does however, have a limit - five nanograms of active THC in your blood, but the only way to measure whether someone has reached or passed that limit is in a hospital with a blood test.”
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